American Hardwoods
Real American Hardwoods

Lumber Grades

You can use accepted industry standards and grading systems to describe the look you and your customer want, and the best way to achieve it within the budget.

Hardwood lumber grades and grading rules have been established and are governed by the National Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA).

The NHLA grading system, which is used by buyers and sellers of hardwood lumber, describes the amount of "usable" clear material in a board. The highest grade boards are long, wide and free of defects.

Boards featuring character marks are not premium grade, but they are preferred for built-ins and many other applications because they add character and visual interest. They're also a great choice for applications where wood will be painted or not be visible. Higher grades of lumber, which have few, if any, character marks, generally are preferred for applications such as fine tabletops and cabinet doors.

For a built-in desk and bookcase, for example, specify upper-grade hardwoods for visible areas, such as the desktop and cabinet doors. Build non-visible areas - sides and interior shelves - from a variety of species in No. 1 Common, a lower-cost, intermediate grade priced less than FAS.

See 20 Species in 4 Virtual Stains in our Species Guide.

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American Hardwood Information Center
American Hardwood Information Center12 hours ago
Decorative millwork can turn bland interiors into memorable spaces. Minnesota-based architect Meriwether Felt installed stained cherry mouldings, trims, and casings in a master bath renovation. “The stained wood warms up the bathroom and provides richness,” he says. “The client asked for a luxurious, yet elegant feeling, and cherry fit the bill perfectly”

#realamericanhardwood #realwood #hardwood #cherry #moulding #molding #trim #homegoals #bathroomgoals #bathroom #bathroomideas #designideas #designinspo #designinspiration #interiordesign

RECENT TWEETS

13 hours ago
#DYK that half the dry weight of a tree is stored carbon and that carbon is stored throughout the life of the tree and any products made from it.

The resolute desk, made from oak, has been a carbon vault since 1880! https://t.co/G25uxojqDs
AmericanHardwds photo
NAFO Forests @NAFO_Forests
Half the dry weight of wood is atmospheric carbon. That includes the resolute desk! When we build with wood, we support working forests, and we create carbon vaults that lock away carbon for the life of the product.

This desk has been holding its carbon since 1880! #Woodisgood https://t.co/cB1vii1TXH

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