Smart, Cost-Effective, Treasured for Generations.

Pacific Coast Maple

Acer macrophyllum - Big leaf maple
 
 

Stain Selector

Clear

Light

Medium

Dark

 

Where It Grows

Principally in the Pacific Northwest, where it is an abundant commercial hardwood. Average height is 60 ft. It grows scattered or in small groves.

Main uses

Furniture, kitchen cabinets, doors, shutters, mouldings, panel stock, turnings, carvings and kitchen utensils.

Relative Abundance

The Pacific Coast Maple is very fast growing; it is the second most abundant species of hardwood trees.

Did You Know?

Pacific Coast Maple is easy on the pocket book; it’s about half the cost of hard maple.

General Description

Its color is pale pinkish-brown to almost white. Generally there is no marked difference between heartwood and sapwood. Its fine grain is similar to birch and cherry with respect to growth ring contrast. It dries easily with little degrade and has good dimensional stability after drying.

Working Properties

Pacific Coast Maple machines well and is excellent for turning. It nails, screws and glues well and can be sanded, stained or painted to a good finish.

Physical Properties

Pacific Coast Maple has medium density, but is slightly harder than eastern soft maple. It has medium bending strength, shock resistance and stiffness.

Availability

Available as lumber and dimension stock.

Working Properties


Machining

 
 
 
 
 
Poor
Good

Nailing

 
 
 
 
 
Poor
Good

Screwing

 
 
 
 
 
Poor
Good

Gluing

 
 
 
 
 
Poor
Good

Finishing

 
 
 
 
 
Poor
Good
 

Strength and Mechanical Properties (inch-pound)a


 

Static Bending

Moisture Content

Specific Gravity (b)

Modulus of Rupture
(lbf/in2)

Modulus of Elasticity (c)
(106 lbf/in2)

Work to Maximum Load
(in-lbf/in3)

Green-12% 0.44-0.48 7,400-10,700 1.10-1.45 7.8-8.7

Impact Bending
to Grain
(in)

Compression
Parallel to Grain
(lbf/in2)

Compression
Perpendicular to Grain
(lbf/in2)

Shear
Parallel to Grain
(lbf/in2)

Tension
Perpendicular to Grain
(lbf/in2)

Side Hardness
(lbf)

23-28 3,240-5,950 450-750 1,110-1,730 540-600 620-850

a) Results of tests on small clear specimens in the green and air-dried conditions. Definition of properties; impact bending is height of drop that causes complete failure, using 0.71-kg (50 lb.) hammer; compression parallel to grain is also called maximum crushing strength; compression perpendicular to grain is fiber stress at proportional limit; shear is maximum shearing strength; tension is maximum tensile strength; and side hardness is hardness measured when load is perpendicular to grain.

b) Specific gravity is based on weight when ovendry and volume when green or at 12% moisture content

c) Modulus of elasticity measured from a simply supported, center-loaded beam, on a span depth ratio of 14/1. To correct for shear reflection, the modulus can be increased by 10%.